Nothing to be “thankful” for!

^Is this your Meal today ?^

More than 45 million turkeys are killed each year at Thanksgiving, and more than 22 million die at Christmas.

Before ending up as holiday centerpieces, these gentle, intelligent birds spend five to six months on factory farms where thousands of them are packed into dark sheds with no more than 3.5 square feet of space per bird. Turkeys on factory farms are denied everything that is natural to them, such as foraging for food, dustbathing, and raising their young.

To keep the overcrowded birds from scratching and pecking each other to death, workers cut off portions of the birds’ toes and upper beaks with hot blades and de-snood the males (the snood is the flap of skin that runs from the beak to the chest). No pain relievers are used during any of these procedures.

Turkeys are genetically bred to grow as fast as possible, and they often become crippled under their own weight. A PETA investigator videotaped one turkey farmer beating sick and injured birds to death with a pole, a killing method deemed “standard industry practice.”

Turkeys won’t breathe fresh air or feel the sun on their backs until they’re shoved onto trucks bound for slaughter. They are transported for hours without food or water through all weather extremes—and many will die on this nightmarish journey.

At the slaughterhouse, the survivors are hung upside-down by their weak and crippled legs before their heads are dragged through an electrified “stunning tank,” which immobilizes but does not kill them. Many birds dodge the tank and are still fully conscious when their throats are slit. If the knife fails to properly cut the birds’ throats, they are scalded alive in the tank of boiling water used for feather removal.

Please don’t support an industry that abuses these fascinating animals. Click here for a free vegetarian starter kit.

Adopt a Turkey Project!

TOUCHED BY A TURKEY
Thousands of Farm Sanctuary visitors have met our feathered friends and seen that turkeys are unique individuals with distinct personalities and feelings, just like other animals. One visitor remarked, “Turkeys remember your face and they will sit closer to you with each day you revisit.” Another visitor told us how she learned to scratch a turkey, “I have scratched dog ears and cows backs and a host of other animal hard-to-reach spots — but I never dreamed a bird, let alone a domestic turkey, would ask for a belly rub.”

TURKEY LOVE
Turkeys love cuddles, kisses and tickles just as much as people do! Read about Lydia the hugging turkey, who liked to give turkey hugs to shelter visitors…or Megan the Cuddling turkey who gives turkey kisses. Like dogs and cats, turkeys are very affectionate and companionable.

Every Thanksgiving, visitors flocked to Farm Sanctuary’s California shelter to receive a hug from Lydia. The famous “hugging turkey” would flap her wings and run toward guests. As visitors bent down, Lydia embraced them by pressing her chest against them and stretching her head and neck over their shoulders. Lydia brought much happiness to her visitors, and she enjoyed teaching people that turkeys need love too!

Since 1986, Farm Sanctuary’s annual Adopt-A-Turkey Project has rescued over one thousand turkeys from a thankless fate at the dinner table and given thousands of people an opportunity to adopt a turkey for the holidays.

Farm Sanctuary’s Adopt-A-Turkey Project offers two ways for people to adopt turkeys this Thanksgiving holiday.

1. Sponsor “adopt” a turkey who lives at Farm Sanctuary’s Watkins Glen, New York or Orland, California shelter for farm animals. For a one-time $20 adoption fee, adopters receive a color photograph of their turkey, an adoption certificate and a year subscription to Farm Sanctuary’s quarterly newsletter. The adoption fee provides funds for feed, bedding and veterinary care for the turkeys. Please call 607-583-2225 or click here to adopt a turkey who lives at Farm Sanctuary.

2. Home adopt and provide a safe, permanent and loving home for two or more turkeys. Home adopters must be vegetarian or vegan, and committed to providing lifelong care for their turkey friends. Individuals interested in home adoptions must complete an adoption application. Approved adopters will be placed on a schedule to have their turkey companions personally delivered by Farm Sanctuary staff on the Turkey Express.

Every year, more people are choosing to celebrate a compassionate Thanksgiving for ALL, by saving a turkey!

The Adopt-A-Turkey Project is a program of Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s largest farm animal rescue and protection organization.

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